Los descendientes del Dresden: News - Buckley O'Meara & the depart from Queenstwon Google+

Friday, 23 May 2014

News - Buckley O'Meara & the depart from Queenstwon

In January 25th 1889, the steamship SS Dresden was moored in the Queenstown port (actual Cobh port, Co. Cork), preparing for his inaugural voyage to the Argentine.
The SS Dresden was a ship from the North German Lloyd, especialy designed for the immigrant transportation. It was contracted by the Argentine Government of those days (Juarez Celman administration - Quirno Costa. Minister of Foreign Affair) for bringring immigrants in order to populate the nation.
The goodbye at the Queenstown port was great. Hundreds of people in the streets and houses of the creek, shaking their handkerchiefs, plenty of joy and wishing good auguries to the immigrants.
On board, an enthusiastic toast, was given in honor to the Argentine Republic (the Promised Land), and to the Argentine Commissioner of the Immigration Department, Mr. Samuel Navarro. From the wharf, strongs shouts of joy of the immigrants could be listened.
During those days, Mr. Buckley O'Meara, the Argentine Immigration Agent in Dublin, sent a letter to anglo-parlant's comunity newspaper, The Standard, in order to draw the attention of estancieros and employers of labour to the departure from Ireland to Buenos Ayres in the SS Dresden, of about 250 irish families, composed of the best of the agricultural, labourin and artisan classes.
He added that those immigrants have "all been chosen with great care regarding characters and suitablility to emigrate to the Republic. To a colony each family would be a cheap acquisition at 100 pounds each".

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Letter from Mr. O'Meara to the Editor of local newspaper The Standard advising the arrival of 250 families on board the SS Dresden.

Published Feb. 10th 1889 - The Standard
9 Lower Sackville Street, Dublin, January 7th
To the Editor of The Standard:
Dear Sir,
Kindly allow me through the columns of The Standard to draw the attention of estancieros and all employers of labour to the departure from Ireland to Buenos Ayres, on the 22nd inst., in the SS Dresden, of about 250 irish families, composed of the best of the agricultural, labourin and artisan classes. Amongst these families the estanciero will find what has been a long-felt-want-good steady honest and hard-working men, who will till his land, turning over a furrow in good old English style; mind his sheep, after a few months, experience of the country’s ways, with far more care and inteligence than has hitherto been shown; and above all, those fortunate enough to secure one or two of these families can safely look forward to being well served for a number of years, and dispense with the worry of continually looking out for suitable servants. The wives and daughters of this families are cooks, parlour, house and diary mands, laundresses, and well up to other femanl country work. Respecting the artisans, the heads of the families and sons are skilled carpenters, blacksmiths, joiners, fitters, etc, etc, and not to be surprised at their trades.
They have all been chosen with great care regarding characters and suitablility to emigrate to the Republic. To a colony each family would be a cheap acquisition at 100 pounds each.
I am so pressed with work that I cannot afford to spare the time that this communication deserves; and before concluding can only again draw the attention of estancieros and all employers of labour who desire their work well done, with peace and happiness in the domestic circle, to come forward and engage the families they may want, as another chance may not offer itself.
Belive me dear Sir
Your obedient servant.

E. B. O’Meara
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Letter from Mr. F. H. Mulhall, who went to Montevideo in order to see the immigrants before their arrived to Buenos Aires. He sent this letter to The Standard. He came on board the SS Dresden with Fr. Gaughren, and others.
Published Feb. 15th 1889 - The Standard

Montevideo, February 14th 1889
The Dresden has just arrived after a splendid trip of 19 days from Queenstown. When the emigrants were shipped all Cork turned out. The streets and house tope where crowded, and I gather from what I heard on board that the most enthusiastic cheers were given for “the Argentine Republic – The Promised Land”. Military and civil dignitaries and countless ladies crowded the house tops, and ladies waving their handkerchiefs came to the ship’s side and cheered Mr Navarro, whom thew warmly thanked for promoting the movement. In fact, I may safely say from what I hear, that the most unbounded enthusiasm and excitement prevailed. Loud shouts for the success of the emigrants were also indulged in.
There are 2000 on board: 1800 Irish and 200 English. There was room for more, and more were coming but for the authorities at Southampton who, when the vessel arrived, made it a point to declare that she would be overcrowded if any more emigrants were allowed to embark.
This is the first voyage of the Dresden which is a splendid ship. She was built by Mr. Worrasco, specially for emigrants and he has another in course of construction, 14 knots an hour.
The Dresden will leave tonight, probable at midnight.
The majority are agriculturists poor but steady and all of good character. They appear to me to be desirous of keeping together if possible.